Medial and lateral Collateral Ligament Injury

The medial  and lateral collateral ligament (MCL)[LCL] is one of four ligaments that are very important to the stability of the knee joint. A ligament is made of tough fibrous material and functions to control excessive movement in the joint.  The MCL runs along the inside of the knee between the end of the thigh bone (femur) to the top of the shin bone (tibia). The LCL runs along the outside of the knee between the end of the thigh bone (femur) to the top of the shin bone (tibia). The MCL and LCL  resists widening of the inside of the joint, or prevents “opening-up” of the knee.  The medial ligament has some deep fibres that attach to the outer edges of the shock absorbing cartilage on the inside of the knee  (the medial meniscus). When the ligament is overly stretched it can result in injury, inflammation and pain on the inside of the knee if MCL and outside of the knee if LCL.

In more severe case this can also result in cartilage damage and / or the anterior cruciate ligament .

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